Religion in American Libraries: An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights | ALA Connect

The courts have consistently held that for the freedom of the press and speech guaranteed by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution to be fully meaningful, people must also have the right to receive information: that is, to read, view, hear or access what they choose, without any limitations imposed by the government. In addition, the First Amendment guarantees the right of individuals to believe and practice their religion or practice no religion at all (the “free exercise” clause) and prohibits government from establishing or endorsing a religion or religions (the “establishment” clause).  Thus the freedom of, for and from religion, are similarly guaranteed by the Constitution.

Source: Religion in American Libraries: An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights | ALA Connect

This document from the Intellectual Freedom Committee of the American Library Association will be up from ALA Council discussion at the Annual Conference in Orlando in June. I think they struck a good balance.

I welcome comments from ALA members in general and from any members of the Alaska Library Association in particular.

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